Individual Pension Plans can supercharge retirement income

Professionals, executives, business owners can benefit

The defined benefit pension plan has pretty much gone the way of the dodo. With one exception: the Individual Pension Plan (IPP). If you’re a business owner or executive, or an incorporated professional, such as a physician, dentist, lawyer, accountant, and so on, and you are over age 40 in your peak earning years, you might consider an IPP. Its many advantages for people in this group certainly outweigh its drawbacks. And as tighter rules for passive investments in private corporations have limited the availability of the small business tax rate, an IPP offers some business tax advantages as well.

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Retiring now? How to avoid pandemic panic

Coping with withdrawal risks and benefiting from RRIF rule changes

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has thrown many retirement plans into disarray. The collapse of the stock market in March, volatility in bond prices, the crash of energy markets, and the shutdown of virtually all economic activity naturally is causing a great deal of anxiety for those who were planning for retirement this year. But even now, there are financial strategies for pre-retirees and those in the early phases of retirement that can help protect your nest-egg and secure your income streams.

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Retirement planning during the pandemic

Robyn Thompson is featured in BNN’s “The Open” with host John Erlichman, discussing how retirement planning is affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and what retirees (and those ready to retire) can do to protect their nest-egg and secure their income streams into the future.

Creating an income stream when your RRSP matures

Three basic RRSP maturity options

Unlike a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA), a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) does not last forever. In fact, it has a specific date by which you must collapse the plan and choose one of three main options for what to do with the proceeds. Here’s a look at how this works. READ MORE

Seniors playing with fire when taking on a big debt

The use and abuse of mortgages in retirement

Are retirees playing with fire? They could be if they decide to use money borrowed through a mortgage to supplement their other sources of retirement income. The most common ways those at or close to retirement do this is to hold a mortgage through their Locked-in Retirement Account (LIRA) or to borrow money against their home through a so-called “reverse mortgage.” But retirees should think long and hard before entering into either of these arrangements. READ MORE

Making retirement income last

Managing income streams tax efficiently

Many people on the cusp of retirement are wondering whether they’ll outlive their retirement nest egg. Even those with hefty savings tucked away in Registered Retirement Savings Plans and Tax-Free Savings Accounts have expressed their concerns to me about becoming destitute in advanced old age and have thus decided to delay CPP and OAS payments while putting off RRSP maturity until the very last possible day of the year in which they turn 71. Is this really necessary? When should you turn on the retirement income taps, and how long will your money really last? READ MORE

What to do with the kids in the basement

The failure-to-launch syndrome

More than one in three Canadians aged 20 to 34 are living with their parents according to the most recent census results from Statistics Canada. Worse yet, parents are still financially supporting them. That can lead to a series of problems, including threatening parents’ retirement nest eggs. READ MORE

Money Makeover: No plan and a high-risk portfolio threaten their retirement security

Robyn Thompson is regularly featured in The Toronto Star’s “Money Makeover” series by Deanne Gage. This month, Money Makeover takes a look at Victor and Shelly, who hope to retire next year, but have a risky investment portfolio and no plan. Read Robyn Thompson’s advice on how this couple can use their substantial pension income along with a sizable inheritance to ensure a financially secure future.

Money Makeover: Will Charlotte run out of money in retirement?

Robyn Thompson is regularly featured in The Toronto Star’s “Money Makeover” series by Deanne Gage. This month, Money Makeover takes a look at Charlotte, a single public relations professional in her mid-forties who is planning on retiring in 20 years.

She says she needs $65,000 a year in retirement income and wants to know if she’s on the right track to meet her goals.

$1 million in assets, but concerned about cash

Robyn Thompson is regularly featured in The Toronto Star’s “Money Makeover” series by Deanne Gage. Money Makeover takes a look at Mary Lou, a 65-year-old widow with a portfolio valued at more than $1 million.

She is uncertain about how much income to withdraw from her investments to meet her lifestyle expenses, but also last her through her golden years.

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