Get credit where it’s due (deductions too)

June 1 tax-filing deadline

With all the stress of the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown, you might have taken advantage of the one-month extension of the tax-filing deadline to June 1. Payment of any tax owing has been extended to Sept. 1, but you must still file a return by June 1. Those who are self-employed have until June 15 to file. There is unlikely to be any further extension of the deadline, so you’d better make sure you have all your information slips ready ahead of the filing deadline on June 1 (all those documents prefixed with a “T” are critical). And make sure you’ve reviewed the list of deductions and credits you might be entitled to. READ MORE

Year-end money management strategies

These tax and investment tips could save you a bundle

Year-end is fast approaching, and with the holiday season getting into full swing, you probably won’t want to think about investments and taxes. Still, there are a few tax and investment moves you could make before Dec. 31 that could save you a few bucks in tax come next April. So here’s my annual list of favorite year-end tax and investment tips. READ MORE

When the CRA comes calling

Refunds and reassessments

Around this time of the year, most taxpayers who filed a tax return in April will be receiving a Notice of Assessment, perhaps with a refund cheque, or what’s worse, a Notice of Reassessment, often with a demand for more tax payment. It’s important to deal with these issues, because each can have an impact on your tax planning for the year. READ MORE

Be sure to claim all your credits and deductions

Don’t leave money on the table

Are you taking all the tax deductions and tax credits you’re entitled to? If you’re a do-it-yourself-type, you may be missing out on some lucrative tax savings because you’re not claiming everything you should, even if you’re using top-quality tax-preparation software. READ MORE

Investment expenses you can deduct

Sorry, it’s a short list

Tax-filing season is upon us, and at this time of the year I get many questions about the kinds of expenses that investors can deduct. Novice investors, especially, have a kind of starry-eyed idea about deducting everything from their subscription to an investment newsletter to the fee they paid to their tax preparer to interest on money borrowed to invest. Unfortunately, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) long ago twigged to this type of thing, and the list of the deductible investment expenses (called “carrying charges” if you want to get technical) has dwindled and become very circumscribed. Here’s a quick review of what’s allowed and what’s not. READ MORE

Year-end tax and investment planning tips

They could save you a bundle

Even though most of us are preoccupied with other things at this time of year, there is a handful of year-end investment and tax tips that make a lot of sense to look at now. That’s because they could save you money now and next April, when it’s time to pay your taxes.

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How to cut the cottage-sale tax bill

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The ABCs of the ACB

Thinking of selling your cottage, cabin, or recreational property? Unless it’s truly your principal residence, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) will want its share of any capital gain you make on the sale. It calculates the capital gain as the proceeds of the sale minus the cost of selling and the adjusted cost base (ACB). Here’s where you can find ways to cut the tax take. But a note of caution: The CRA are fully aware of ACB games people play with cottage sales, so ensure that all the components of the ACB are documented and are all bona fide. READ MORE

Oops! The CRA wants more – now what do you do?

You can fight with a Notice of Objection

Taxpayers start getting tax refunds from the Canada Revenue Agency in April and May. That may be a cause for celebration. But if you get a Notice of Re-assessment, it can contain a nasty surprise, complete with demands for more tax payments along with penalties and interest to boot. But if you think you’re in the right, there is a way to appeal that Notice. READ MORE

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